Shadow government up and running

It may still be in the early, trial phase but the shadow government seems to be getting its feet on the ground as fast — or faster — than Trump can get his own administration up and running. Which is all probably their main objective. So here we are.

Loretta Lynch Played This Shocking Role In Setting Up A Coup Against Trump

American Patriot Daily News

The Trump administration has been plagued by leaks from the intelligence community.

Many believe these leaks were intended to destabilize the Trump Presidency and represent a soft coup.

And you won’t believe the role Loretta Lynch played in this plot.

Shortly before leaving office, Attorney General Loretta Lynch signed a directive loosening the rules on the NSA’s ability to share intercepted electronic communications with 16 other federal agencies, as well as their foreign counterparts.

The New York Times reports:

“In its final days, the Obama administration has expanded the power of the National Security Agency to share globally intercepted personal communications with the government’s 16 other intelligence agencies before applying privacy protections.

The new rules significantly relax longstanding limits on what the N.S.A. may do with the information gathered by its most powerful surveillance operations, which are largely unregulated by American wiretapping laws. These include collecting satellite transmissions, phone calls and emails that cross network switches abroad, and messages between people abroad that cross domestic network switches.

The change means that far more officials will be searching through raw data. Essentially, the government is reducing the risk that the N.S.A. will fail to recognize that a piece of information would be valuable to another agency, but increasing the risk that officials will see private information about innocent people.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch signed the new rules, permitting the N.S.A. to disseminate “raw signals intelligence information,” on Jan. 3, after the director of national intelligence, James R. Clapper Jr., signed them on Dec. 15, according to a 23-page, largely declassified copy of the procedures.”

Now some critics are arguing this new order was the driving force behind the leaks that took down National Security Advisor Michael Flynn.

Jay Sekulow, the chief counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice, is one of those critics.

In an interview with Sean Hannity, he argued that this order created a “shadow government” by expanding the pool of people able to access intercepted communications which would otherwise be classified.

Zero Hedge reports on his remarks:

“There was a sea-change here at the NSA with an order that came from president Obama 17 days before he left office where he allowed the NSA who used to control the data, it now goes to 16 other agencies and that just festered this whole leaking situation, and that happened on the way out, as the president was leaving the office.

Why did the Obama administration wait until it had 17 days left in their administration to put this order in place if they thought it was so important. They had 8 years, they didn’t do it, number one. Number two, it changed the exiting rule which was an executive order dating back to Ronald Reagan, that has been in place until 17 days before the Obama administration was going to end, that said the NSA gets the raw data, and they determine dissemination.

Instead, this change that the president put in place, signed off by the way by James Clapper on December 15, 2016, signed off by Loretta Lynch the Attorney General January 3, 2017, they decide that now 16 agencies can get the raw data and what that does is almost creates a shadow government. You have all these people who are not agreeing with President Trump’s position, so it just festers more leaks.

If they had a justification for this, wonderful, why didn’t they do it 8 years ago, 4 years ago, 3 years ago. Yet they wait until 17 days left.”

Obama supporters within the intelligence community have waged what some believe is a coup against Trump by using cherry-picked leaks to frame the information in the most damaging light possible.

Was this coup ultimately enabled by Loretta Lynch?

At least one expert is saying “yes.”

Original article at http://www.americanpatriotdaily.com/latest/loretta-lynch-shocking-role-setting-up-coup-against-trump

But it is not just the shadow government concerns at issue, it also enables the deep state that seems perpetually plotting against Trump. We have a real problem there.

It’s strange(not) that information was a rare commodity in the Obama adminstration. Now they spread information everywhere, leaks abound. No leaks and whistle blowers under Obama. Now, with their loyal allies in the media, they’ve become the angry yet powerful and permanent opposition. That is why the leaks need serious investigation.

All this information flowing, but yet we still do not even know the whereabouts of Obama during the Benghazi attack. How’s that?

Realted: https://www.americanpatriotdaily.com/latest/investigation-bring-down-obamas-shadow-government/
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Summer of Scandal

Well, it’s the beginning of summer. It’s always a special time in the changes of the season. Unless you are a climate change cultist.

But it is a great season. Some of us have been waiting for months for it, after a winter of discontent. Previously, Biden dubbed it “the summer of recovery’. Then we needed a recovery from the non-recovery.

So I thought thought this year should be labeled “the summer of scandals”. Maybe there could be theme barbecues? You know throw another one on the grill, can’t have enough. Declare it scandal-palooza.

We’re almost up to a scandal a week. There are so many scandals that you could get lost on which is more import, or which one to talk about. Is it Benghazi, NSA, fast and furious, the IRS, Gitmo-gate? Or maybe it’s the outing the CIA chief in Afghanistan?

So many to choose from. Is it the flood of illegal aliens across the borders, and dispersing them around the country? Or will it be the VA scandal, still gathering steam? Maybe its ObamaCare? Obama’s executive rewrite? Is it “I didn’t know”-gate? The executive order Dream Act? Or how about the Dep of Injustice and ever-contemptible Holder? Or the new EPA roll out in the war on energy? Or will it be I got a pen and a phone. Or could it be Obama’s denials that there are any scandals? Or maybe the Muslim Brotherhood insurgency in this administration? Or maybe it’s those recess appointments with no recess. Or administration suits against Christians like Hobby Lobby, or the Catholic nuns? Or everything surrounding his secretive records and election to office, to the non-transparency of now? One thing that you cannot be anymore is shocked .

But it would be pretty hard not to talk about any of them. Which brings us to the lamestream media. I anticipate in the next few weeks Barry has a meeting with the press, you know, to give them a little direction. What is increasingly difficult though is not talking about any of it, which is the predicament the media is in.

Maybe some are so stymied by it all that they can’t talk about any of it. They could be one of those that when mentioned in conversation h/she says: “oh, I don’t follow that stuff.” That’s always a good reply.

We can just call any that disagree deniers. But at some point, we are going to need a recovery from scandal. That seems far away. It all reminds me of Paine’s piece:

“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.” — “The Crisis” by Thomas Paine, 1776

And he said:

There are persons, too, who see not the full extent of the evil which threatens them; they solace themselves with hopes that the enemy, if he succeed, will be merciful. It is the madness of folly, to expect mercy from those who have refused to do justice; and even mercy, where conquest is the object, is only a trick of war; the cunning of the fox is as murderous as the violence of the wolf, and we ought to guard equally against both.

Enjoy the summer of scandal. Don’t get a sunburn.

RightRing | Bullright

New posts at Nox and Friends

The Survey Says: doctors resisting ObmaCare

    New and interesting survey results on NY doctors are overwhelmingly negative. I suppose this will be another group on the list to get the Chicago bully treatment. Who else can they bully to shut down their voice of resistance?

Note to Virginia: don’t get Corzined

    I finally put my finger on who McAuliffe reminds me of – defunct fmr. NJ Governor, Jon Corzine.
    Not in looks but, in my opinion, if Virginia elected McAuliffe he would be just like a Corzine rewind.

Responsibility and Accountability – surely you jest!

If all these people are losing their medical coverage, then someone should be losing their job. (plural) That’s logical.

Democrats version of taking responsibility is Hillary Clinton — the gold standard for taking evading responsibility.

How is it that all these officials come out to say they take full responsibility and yet none of them ever do? That sounds like something Andy Rooney might say.

Cair sets stage for Greenwald appearance and media

Next month, America will be treated to an Islam-fest, compliments of CAIR. On the stage as keynote speaker is Greenwald, the reporter behind the NSA leaks story.

The twisted irony is that if NSA monitors Greewald closely, it would point them right back to the greatest threat to America, outside our subversive ‘heads in the sand’ government.

Cars and ObamaCare’s Utopia Special

Suppose you had a car you were happy with and planned on keeping it as long as you could. It fits you perfectly. Then you receive notice that your car will be illegal in 90 days but, no problem, you can come and buy a new one that costs twice as much, they say. Probably the Government will give you a couple bucks toward it, for the time being anyway.

You tell them but I like this car and wanted to keep it. They say, “tough, it will become illegal and obsolete.

Ailing US Investment gets boost from energy

This might be a tough article without the nice graphs and using a progressive report for this. But hold on to your oysters because I think no matter the source, the message is pretty clear. If not, there are plenty of other sources, even better ones.

In a report from Progressive Policy Institute titled “US investment heroes of 2013: the companies betting on America’s future”, the underlying point though is:

“total domestic investment fell drastically during
the recession and has yet to fully recover.”

But its billed as the heroes investing in America, based largely on 2012.

ObamaCare is a failure… but don’t blame DMV

I had enough of seeing the ObamaCare failures and comparing it to the DMV. It has been used all over the media. DMV is a good punch line, I get it. I don’t want to give ObamaCare a pass. I’ll just say what some people must be thinking.

Obamacare is bad and DMV is bad, agreed, bureaucracy is bad. But come on, at least when you go to DMV you come out with a registration or something. I know, the service stinks but they have live people waiting on you. Alright, so probably four times as many as they need… but still live people.

Truth gushes out depite liberal dams

Anna Gorman and Julie Appleby Kaiser Health News

Health plans are sending hundreds of thousands of cancellation letters to people who buy their own coverage, frustrating some consumers who want to keep what they have and forcing others to buy more costly policies.

Open secret: Washington’s Cosa Nostra

Washington’s open secret: Profitable PACs — 60 minutes report

I’ll only point out one of the many examples.

There are not enough ways to say outrage, prisoners getting paid by fed

Feds Paid Prisoners $1 Million in Disability Payments

Average received $2,322 each
BY: Elizabeth Harrington | October 21, 2013 | Freebeacon

The Social Security Administration (SSA) gave more than $1 million in improper disability benefits to 440 prisoners, according to the inspector general.

More at http://hardnoxandfriends.com/

S-O’l Obama Hypocrite – 3

The dancing hypocrite takes his show to the stage – part 3 [See Part 1]

Obama did Jay Leno to roll out his thoughts on national security, Benghazi, and embassy closings. Did someone move the press room to NBC studios?…

In this episode, we find Hypobama deeply engrossed in the NSA which has grown into a dragnet.

Recap: After explaining in the last episode how we had the proper reactions to terrorism like the Boston bombing, with our super-resilience abilities, and how we do not let a little terrorism shut us down, he now explains why we are wrong about NSA and our concerns about the increasing dragnet of phone records and FISA courts vacuuming up our information. But yet we’re right, somehow, for having concerns about them, even if our concerns are not substantiated — if that makes any sense.

Q: It’s safe to say that we learned about these threats through the NSA intelligence program? Is that a fair assessment?
THE PRESIDENT: Well, this intelligence-gathering that we do is a critical component of counterterrorism. And obviously, with Mr. Snowden and the disclosures of classified information, this raised a lot of questions for people. But what I said as soon as it happened I continue to believe in, which is a lot of these programs were put in place before I came in. I had some skepticism, and I think we should have a healthy skepticism about what government is doing. I had the programs reviewed. We put in some additional safeguards to make sure that there’s federal court oversight as well as congressional oversight, that there is no spying on Americans.
We don’t have a domestic spying program. What we do have are some mechanisms where we can track a phone number or an email address that we know is connected to some sort of terrorist threat. And that information is useful. But what I’ve said before I want to make sure I repeat, and that is we should be skeptical about the potential encroachments on privacy. None of the revelations show that government has actually abused these powers, but they’re pretty significant powers.
And I’ve been talking to Congress and civil libertarians and others about are there additional ways that we can make sure that people know nobody is listening to your phone call, but we do want to make sure that after a Boston bombing, for example, we’ve got the phone numbers of those two brothers — we want to be able to make sure did they call anybody else? Are there networks in New York, are there networks elsewhere that we have to roll up? And if we can make sure that there’s confidence on the part of the American people that there’s oversight, then I think we can make sure that we’re properly balancing our liberty and our security.

Oh, he’s been talking to civil libertarians? I bet their phones are ringing off the hook.(pardon the pun) He mentioned that again in his speech days later. Who is he talking to? He hasn’t offered one name. He can’t.

If the NSA techniques are so instrumental, how did it fail on the Boston bombers? Now he wants to use the very attacks that happened on his watch, and that sordid course of events, from Benghazi to the Boston bombing, to justify the program.

“…put in place before I came in. I had some skepticism.” (as he rings the Bush bell)
Its amazing that he has critics all over the place and how he tries to run out in front of the parade of criticism against him. What hypocrisy. He’s taken these policies to new heights, as a dragnet. Sometimes you cannot be on both sides. Oh, now that he has no criticism of NSA no one else should? (and his credibility is excellent)

If we can make sure there’s confidence on the part of the American people that there’s oversight” ? Well, having results to justify it would help. Did it really help? I’m not even sure the legitimate, inter-government phone calls from Benghazi were responded to correctly. But they did get all those calls.

Please, do tell us about the need for congressional oversight. I’ll be waiting.
Make the case and make my day!

The real point is how this government responds or doesn’t to threats, namely to terrorism in general. So the problem is not that they don’t have access to enough information. Benghazi showed that. It’s not just what they have access to but what they do with it.

We do not know if they are going to abuse or extort the information against us, or only apply it to pursue terrorists. Pandora’s box is opened. Look what they did at IRS.

I don’t know of a department of the federal government Obama has not politicized. What information do they not have access to? Companies are turning over passwords and user names. Is he making the case for that?

Let’s summarize: If he can only convince us to have “confidence”, then we “properly balanced our liberty and our security”. That is his basic message. We just need to be convinced to have confidence. Remember that hope theme?

Snowden’s faith in Obama was rocked

Snowden had ‘faith’ in Obama, but was disappointed

By JENNIFER EPSTEIN — Politico

6/17/13

 Edward Snowden says he decided to release classified information about national security surveillance after President Obama failed to live up to his 2008 campaign promises.

“Obama’s campaign promises and election gave me faith that he would lead us toward fixing the problems he outlined in his quest for votes,” Snowden said in a Monday question-and-answer session with readers of The Guardian. “Many Americans felt similarly.”

“Unfortunately,” he continued, “shortly after assuming power, [Obama] closed the door on investigating systemic violations of law, deepened and expanded several abusive programs, and refused to spend the political capital to end the kind of human rights violations like we see in Guantanamo, where men still sit without charge.” 

Sounds like that snowball of Snowden’s turned into a boulder, sitting on his shoulder.
And Obama’s ‘campaign blame’ is getting a dose of his own medicine.

History, Hitler, Holocaust — denial, databases, and destruction

It Can Happen Here

Posted on Sun 06/30/2013 by papundits

By Alan Caruba ~

The gates of Auschwitz, one of the infamous Nazi concentration camps.

The gates of Auschwitz, one of the infamous Nazi concentration camps.

“How the Jews Defeated Hitler” is the title of a new book by Dr. Benjamin Ginsberg PhD, subtitled “Exploding the Myth of Jewish Passivity in the Face of Nazism.”  The title is counter-intuitive because, as is well known, the Nazis murdered six million Jews in Europe during the course of a deliberate genocide that has since become known as the Holocaust.

The author is a professor of political science and is chair of the Center for Advanced Governmental Studies at Johns Hopkins University and the book is more than just a history of that horrific period of history. It is not that long ago. I was a child at the time so, within the living memory of the survivors, their children and grandchildren, as well as others like myself around the world, it is living history.

The value of the book is the way it explains how many of the Jews of Europe, particularly those herded into ghettos, failed to grasp what was happening. “It was initially difficult for most Jews to believe that the Germans actually intended to kill them all.”

 

Another major factor was that the Nazis ensured that they were disarmed and unable to defend themselves, as were others who opposed the regime.

Where resistance fighters emerged, Ginsburg notes that “Germany relied, especially in Western Europe, on the help of local police forces to deal with partisans, and, especially in France and Holland, whose local police were quite helpful.” In occupied France, “The French police helpfully compiled a card index of all the Jews of Paris by name, street, occupation, and nationality.”

Therein lies the fears and concerns of Americans as they slowly come to realize that their government not only knows where they live, but a great deal of information about them courtesy of the Internal Revenue Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Homeland Security, the National Security Agency, right on down to their local law enforcement authorities.

If or when Obamacare is fully implemented, anonymous bureaucrats will be able to “target” selected Americans who are seeking medical care for death simply by denying it. No need to set up concentration camps to kill them en mass. Just as the little girl who needed a lung transplant that was initially denied by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, individuals identified as “patriots” or other enemies of the state could simply be allowed to die.

So, yes, it can happen here
[/…]

Read more: http://papundits.wordpress.com/2013/06/30/it-can-happen-here/

 
Excellent article. Here in the US, they waged a campaign to marginalize any dissent or opposition to their schemes all along.

Big–Bro just got a whole lot smarter

News articles are surfacing that Google, in partnership with NASA, has acquired a new super computer from D-Wave, a Canadian based company.

Its called a quantum computer with specs only a geek might understand. But I think anyone with brain cells should be able to understand the significance of it.

*Google is the front end to the NSA spying network. (and also involved with Obama’s campaign efforts) Why would a publicly held company Google team up with a government agency (NASA) and buy a quantum computer? Quantum computers have self-learning potential and become smarter using quantum algorithms, which run faster than any possible probabilistic classical algorithm. The end result is humans will no longer be needed to capture data OR analyze it. Quantum computers can do all this on their own.

Maybe its a marriage of fate? Artificial intelligence is the goal and destination.

*This can eliminate the pesky problem government faces with whistle blowers (I.E. Edward Snowden et al, those before him). The government now has a much more efficient way of keeping their massive data collection hidden from the general public and also the organizations whose job is to ensure the government does not break any constitutional laws.

First is a video that was posted by Natural News, a chilling radio discussion.
(also see their other report) Google purchased it.

Second, a piece from CNN talking about D-Wave NASA connection

Even CNN reported on it. Of course,they lightly touch on the many concerns about privacy and pretty much ignore the cozy relationship with NSA. This is CNN interviewing an expert about the quantum purchase related to the Google/NASA partnership.

It wasn’t until the end when they finally considered privacy concerns, as  sort of an afterthought, that the analyst described the use and was compelled to say “hopefully, Google will use it as a force for good”. Ah, now that’s a relief. And if not?… Remind me to check back with these bright analysts.

By the way, these pictures of rocks on Mars may be really neat, but there is plenty more they can do with quantum capabilities than space travel and taking pictures.
birdshaped rock Rock photo 2

The type of computing it does especially pertains to the security area of data collecting and breaking communications. The ultimate goal of simulated or artificial intelligence. Of course, the analyst hopes they use its capabilities for good. But maybe we have to reexamine the term “good” too, like everything else they do. As I read the information to date, it will be growing exponentially in capacity over the next few years.

 

So where is this tin foil-plagued administration?

Last year Obama rolled out a big data initiative. With the enormous collection of data they now do, analysis of that data is a challenge. Enter the need for super computers and storage to feed their insatiable appetite to know as much as they can in real-time about Americans. (now that the genie is out of the bottle)

The Daily Caller had an interview with former NSA analyst William Binney, who has been sounding the alarm for over a decade, where he described their vacuum operation of pretty much everything communication-wise, and of an estimated 80% of what goes up on the web. Hence the need for analysis.

Binney: That’s my point. When you ask how much damage these leaks have done to our capability, they’ve actually done absolutely nothing. The terrorists were monitoring all of this information anyway, so they had a pretty good idea of what was being collected. So, who are we keeping this from? It’s not the terrorists. We are really keeping it from the American public. Because that’s who they’re collecting data about. And that’s who they’re keeping it secret from. The terrorists already knew all this stuff.

The President’s Data Initiatives last year is data mining on steroids, or quantum style.
Obama’s initiative is chuck full of a wish list catering to those needs:

“Accelerating and expanding efforts to make government information resources more publicly accessible in “computer-readable” form and spurring the use of those data by entrepreneurs as fuel for the creation of new products, services, and jobs.”

Note the spin on terms of use being for entrepreneurs and jobs. All of it is built around data mining. Yea and the educational goals and jobs, but the real focus is on the information of Americans. Like a kid in a toy store or candy shop, he suggests all the different possible ventures. All of it interdependent on this information. Prism is only part of the collection resources: with ObamaCare, medical, the IRS, phone and data communications, just as all the helpful “sign up” programs were instrumental to Obama’s data mining operation since his first campaign.

Government sets itself up as the keeper of all information, especially all the personal information it can get its greedy hands on. (they probably know about that birthmark) Wow, what it can do with that information – for your benefit of course. As if we cannot wait to be tracked in every move. Then its sharing capacity for all the new uses it can find for that information. Privacy be damned.

They believe in privacy for killing a baby in the womb, but for everything else, you get the probing “public eye”. How’s that colonoscopy working out for you? Eat more broccoli.

Listen to the words of Obama’s sales pitch about the vast “Initiatives” program:

The Open Data Initiatives project is “liberating” government data and voluntarily-contributed corporate data to fuel entrepreneurship, create jobs, and improve the lives of Americans in tangible ways. As a model, decades ago, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began making weather data available for free electronic download by anyone. Entrepreneurs used these data to create weather newscasts, websites, mobile applications, insurance, and much more. Similarly, the government’s decision to make the Global Positioning System (GPS) freely available has fueled a vast array of private-sector innovations ranging from navigation systems to precision crop farming, creating massive public benefit and contributing significantly to economic growth. More recently, the Health Data Initiative, launched by the Institute of Medicine and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2010, has opened growing amounts of health-related knowledge and information in computer-readable form from the vaults of the government and publicized the availability of these data to entrepreneurs and innovators. Hundreds of companies and nonprofits have used these data to develop new products and services that are helping millions of Americans and creating jobs of the future in the process. Working closely with the US Chief Technology Officer, the US Chief Information Officer, and an array of agencies, the Open Data Initiatives team has launched and is continuing to scale open data efforts in Health, Energy, Education, Finance, Public Safety, and Global Development. These efforts involve government releasing general data resources in computer-readable form and in accordance with policies that rigorously protect privacy. The goal is to stimulate a rising tide of private-sector entrepreneurship that leverages these data to create tools that help Americans find the right health care provider for them, identify the college that provides the best value for their money, save money on their electricity bills through smarter shopping for the right rate plan, keep their families safe by knowing which products have been recalled, and much more – a rising tide of innovation that also contributes to economic growth and creates jobs.

Oh yes, it’s all to help you. Pay no mind to all the information sharing capability and big-brother collection resources that make all that possible. Welcome to ‘Big Brother 3.0, quantum scale. It’s what his initiative is really all about, big government.

But he is not done:

For Round 2, we are looking for Presidential Innovation Fellows to work on the existing Open Data Initiatives in Health, Energy, Education, Finance, Public Safety, and Global Development, as well as the following new data innovation efforts: [building virtual learning etc etc]

They have quite the appetite, don’t they? I’m sure it is educational learning they are concerned with.

Yes, Jane, you can kill your baby in the warm auspices of “privacy rights” under the federal government’s fiat law, just don’t try to opt out of the governmental data (abuse) system….it won’t be their hard drive that fails. But Obama vows to “fight” for your abortion right and free contraceptives.

Note how they always refer to it as “government data”. Government is the hub for it, I’ll grant them that. It all becomes government data. Funny how it transforms itself from private personal data into government data to market and extort. And then the pitch: ‘look how helpful all this will be to you.’ Sorry, it makes me want to hurl listening to their rosy vision of an America under super-surveillance, and how beneficial that all is to us serfs.

*Big-Brother just got so much smarter that little brother isn’t even needed anymore. Anyone ever seen the movie “Terminator”?

Some people are already calling it Skynet. Maybe the Skynet is befalling you, and that isn’t Chicken Little?

* with added collaboration from Dave- h/t

Resources: Natural News, Obama’s open data initiatives, William Binney/Daily Caller
Related: Breitbart: Maxine Waters reveals Obamas database w/ voters private info.
previous: Big Brother is in the house… ; Spy Center Surrounded in Secrecy
https://rightring.wordpress.com/2013/06/24/unsecure-in-papers-and-possessions/

unSecure in Papers and Possessions

All the talk is about information collection, sharing, government spying, and storage of that personal information — privacy be damned. Okay, the NSA and government apologists parse that down to identifiable information.

They claim that the collection of everyone’s’ phone records is generic unidentifiable information so it can safely be used, abused, extorted and pilfered for content, to their hearts’ content. I have a little bit of a problem with that.

See, in the fourth amendment it does not guarantee you the right to be secure in only your “identifiable” information. So now you can reasonably expect to be secure in your person and possessions, but only if they are identifiable to you. That’s the message.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

They will admit that if one looks hard enough at this information it leads to the identity of a person. But they assure us that our identity is protected. My identity is not ALL I’m concerned about. So it’s as if when your name is removed, that information is no longer yours — then it can belong to anyone.(just because it cannot be traceable to you) But it doesn’t, it still belongs to me. Someone generated or created it, and that someone is me.

Now tell me I’m supposed to be comforted by their using and pilfering my information. That starts to not make sense to me.

They do similar things to medical records and call them non-identifiable medical information. This is like claiming if they remove your name from the DNA then it is not your DNA anymore. Get it? I don’t think this game of hoodwink is what the authors of the DOI and the Constitution’s Bill of Right’s had in mind.

My right to be secure in my papers and possessions is not limited to those with my name or identifiable information on them. It’s nice you say you are going to lengths to spare my identity from being extorted for some purpose, but just because you make it unidentifiable does not mean it’s not mine.

There is a word for that in other areas of law, like fraud and theft. People scratch names and serial numbers off things to hide the real owners’ identity and extort the property for what they can. That would be fraud and theft, by deception. But when our government does it, we are supposed to appreciate it because they are protecting our identity.

They’ve made it about identity. They have us believe that identity is key to my right to be secure in my papers and property. Someone actually made and placed that call from the corner of Broad and Jefferson. But if we pretend we don’t know who made it then it is fair game for the government and for any purposes anyone wants to use it. Or any purposes government allows it to be used, which is more the point.

They reinterpret a few words in the Constitution(Kelo) and voila, your property is up for grabs to the highest bidder or crony to those in political power. But your property is what they have their designs on. You may own it, at the discretion and will of powers that be.

So those papers that do not have my name on them are, well, not really mine anymore. A few key strokes can make my information a public commodity or useful tool. In that case, I am tasked with the burden to prove they are mine, something like proving your innocence. If someone removed my name and account number from a bank, that money belongs to me. Except now I just have the burden to prove its mine. And if they are that good creative at this shell game, then what could they do with finance?

All this while they can’t protect the records or identities of military putting their lives on the line for our rights.

StartPage search engine privacy

No PRISM. No Surveillance. No Government Back Doors. You Have our Word on it.

Giant US government Internet spying scandal revealed

The Washington Post and The Guardian have revealed a US government mass Internet surveillance program code-named “PRISM”. They report that the NSA and the FBI have been tapping directly into the servers of nine US service providers, including Facebook, Microsoft, Google, Apple, Yahoo, YouTube, AOL and Skype, and began this surveillance program at least seven years ago. (clarifying slides)
These revelations are shaking up an international debate.
StartPage has always been very outspoken when it comes to protecting people’s privacy and civil liberties. So it won’t surprise you that we are a strong opponent of overreaching, unaccountable spy programs like PRISM. In the past, even government surveillance programs that were begun with good intentions have become tools for abuse, for example tracking civil rights and anti-war protesters.
Programs like PRISM undermine our Privacy, disrupt faith in governments, and are a danger to the free Internet.
StartPage and its sister search engine Ixquick have in their 14-year history never provided a single byte of user data to the US government, or any other government or agency. Not under PRISM, nor under any other program in the US, nor under any program anywhere in the world. We are not like Yahoo, Facebook, Google, Apple, Skype, or the other US companies who got caught up in the web of PRISM surveillance.
Here’s how we are different:
  • StartPage does not store any user data. We make this perfectly clear to everyone, including any governmental agencies. We do not record the IP addresses of our users and we don’t use tracking cookies, so there is literally no data about you on our servers to access. Since we don’t even know who our customers are, we can’t share anything with Big Brother. In fact, we’ve never gotten even a single request from a governmental authority to supply user data in the fourteen years we’ve been in business.
  • StartPage uses encryption (HTTPS) by default. Encryption prevents snooping. Your searches are encrypted, so others can’t “tap” the Internet connection to snoop what you’re searching for. This combination of not storing data together with using strong encryption for the connections is key in protecting your Privacy.
  • Our company is based in The Netherlands, Europe. US jurisdiction does not apply to us, at least not directly. Any request or demand from ANY government (including the US) to deliver user data, will be thoroughly checked by our lawyers, and we will not comply unless the law which actually applies to us would undeniably require it from us. And even in that hypothetical situation, we refer to our first point; we don’t even have any user data to give. We will never cooperate with voluntary spying programs like PRISM.
  • StartPage cannot be forced to start spying. Given the strong protection of the Right to Privacy in Europe , European governments cannot just start forcing service providers like us to implement a blanket spying program on their users. And if that ever changed, we would fight this to the end.

Privacy. It’s not just our policy, it’s our business.

https://startpage.com/eng/download-startpage-plugin.html

H/T to Pepp for forwarding the  link to add it.

A job for NSA

Here’s a real challenge for NSA. If you are so good, then check into Obama’s records. How about college records for starters?

You do check on threats to national security, right? Well, that would be Obama, like when he is over talking off-mic to Russian presidents promising “flexibility”.

Oh right, you are busy with that database of everyone’s phone records, and mining internet activity. That does leave little extra time.

Obama’s records are probably the one thing our illustrious “leaker” doesn’t have on his thumb drive.

“Your mission, should you accept it…”

Speaking of self-destructing:
President Obnoxious says he will be leaving office “sometime in the next 3 1/2 years”…

Do you think we can narrow that time frame down a little? No time like the present!
“Targeted”, yea that’s just the word I was looking for.

Snowden patriot or patsy?

For those that were quick to call Snowden a hero, freedom fighter and patriotic whistle blower, I did not. I don’t hold it against anyone if they see it differently.

It’s possible he is a Leftist or Marxist rebel too. And his dealing with China press is propelling that possibility. So I reserve those terms for true patriots. He seems to be attracting the same cult following as Manning as well. Given his youth, I’m also skeptical.

Was the info helpful to confirm what most of us had already surmised anyway? Sure, but he comes with some extra baggage. He did expose the lies to the unanswered questions by unelected, bureaucratic elites.

Snowden’s U.S. hacking claim captures Chinese attention

By Jia Lynn Yang, Published: June 13 — Washington Post

HONG KONG —For days the reaction in mainland China to the presence in this city of Edward Snowden, who has confessed to leaking information about secret U.S. surveillance programs, was almost total indifference. Now, with his claim that the U.S. government has been hacking Chinese institutions for years, he has the country’s attention.

His decision to talk about U.S. espionage operations in other countries marked an apparent turn from earlier statements that his primary motive was to expose his government’s abuse of civil liberties. The South China Morning Post said Snowden had showed them “unverified documents” corroborating his claims about U.S. cyberattacks against China and Hong Kong.

Snowden said: “My intention is to ask the courts and people of Hong Kong to decide my fate. I have been given no reason to doubt your system.’’

Read more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/snowdens-us-hacking-claim-captures-chinese-attention/2013/06/13/e8303ffa-d417-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_story.html

Lawmakers Deny Knowing About Cell Phone, Internet Tracking

Newsmax

Saturday, 08 Jun 2013 10:07 AM

By Sandy Fitzgerald

Congressional intelligence briefing sessions have not included details about President Barack Obama’s data-gathering programs, despite claims by the president that Congress approved the measures and “every member” knew about them, Republican Rep. Aaron Schock said.

I can assure you the phone number tracking of non-criminal, non-terrorist suspects was not discussed,” the Illinois lawmaker told Politico. “Most members have stopped going to their classified briefings because they rarely tell us anything we don’t already know in the news. It really has become a charade.”

Responding to the furor over the National Security Agency’s data monitoring programs, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky introduced legislation Friday that requires a warrant be issued before any government agency can search phone records of Americans.

Paul calls the revelation of the program to collect phone records of millions of Verizon customers “an astounding assault on the Constitution.”

But meanwhile, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle deny Obama’s claims that they knew about plans to monitor cell phone and Internet use of Americans, and many said they either learned of the programs through the news or after asking specifically to be briefed.

Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., said that the average member of Congress doesn’t receive such briefings, and would not have know about programs to monitor cell phone records and Internet use unless they were on an intelligence committee, like Schock, were in special sessions in 2011 or asked to be briefed.

Durbin said he only learned about the two programs after asking for a briefing after being urged by Democratic Sen Ron Wyden of Oregon.

And while Obama said members of Congress “could raise those issues very aggressively,” Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland told Attorney General Eric Holder Thursday that the news that Congress was “fully briefed” came as a surprise to her and other lawmakers.

“This ‘fully briefed’ is something that drives us up the wall, because often ‘fully briefed’ means a group of eight leadership; it does not necessarily mean relevant committees,” Mikulski said.

Briefings were made available, and regularly given to those on House and Senate intelligence committees, but weren’t offered — except by request — to other lawmakers.
The Senate Intelligence Committee has in the past invited all 100 senators to read a classified report concerning “roving authority for electronic surveillance” in a secure location in the Hart Senate Office Building, but Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said she does not know how many actually read the report.

In addition, nine senators and 61 congressmen have taken office after the 2010 and 2011 briefings, and new members like Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas say they were not informed of either program without asking about it.

“Americans trusted President Obama when he came to office promising the most transparent administration in history,” Cruz said Friday. “But that trust has been broken and the only way to earn it back is to tell the truth.”

http://www.newsmax.com/Headline/congress-obama-surveillance-tracking/2013/06/08/id/508783?s=al&promo_code=13C51-1

H/T to Dave for article

Do we have anyone in Washington who does know anything. Naturally, there are a lot of new members. For Obama to claim everyone was briefed was yet another lie. What’s one more when you’re on a roll?

Wyden questions Clapper

At the end of that exchange is where Clapper gives his now famous answer

Wyden asked: Does the NSA collect ANY type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans.

Clapper responds: “ No Sir. …Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect but not wittingly.”

So as if by some freak accident, they could ”inadvertently collect” data. A court order is pretty big inadvertent. I suppose “perhaps” they just stumbled across a court authorized order and thereby are collecting all the data… all by some accident of course.

You have to laugh that this is the director of intelligence. He earlier tried to hand off questions directed at him to Mueller in FBI.

This Verizon dragnet is the biggest inadvertent data collection that I think I ever heard of. A historic first.

This isn’t one of those “depends on the definition of IS” questions. I am struck then on how much unwitting data collection they are doing. Almost like, maybe, they were intentionally trying to do it? I know that sounds ridiculous, and I apologize.

The point in this is not about the data-collection issue, it is about lying. That would be intentionally not telling the truth, for anyone unsure. There used to be another word….

If Clapper lied about data collection, what are the chances he can lie about them keeping “dossiers” on millions of people? NSA called that a false claim.

NSA collecting phone records of millions of Verizon customers daily (Guardian)

[Guardian]Exclusive: Top secret court order requiring Verizon to hand over all call data shows scale of domestic surveillance under Obama

Under the terms of the order, the numbers of both parties on a call are handed over, as is location data and the time and duration of all calls.

Glenn Greenwald

The National Security Agency is currently collecting the telephone records of millions of US customers of Verizon, one of America’s largest telecoms providers, under a top secret court order issued in April.
The order, a copy of which has been obtained by the Guardian, requires Verizon on an “ongoing, daily basis” to give the NSA information on all telephone calls in its systems, both within the US and between the US and other countries.
The document shows for the first time that under the Obama administration the communication records of millions of US citizens are being collected indiscriminately and in bulk – regardless of whether they are suspected of any wrongdoing.
The secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (Fisa) granted the order to the FBI on April 25, giving the government unlimited authority to obtain the data for a specified three-month period ending on July 19.
Under the terms of the blanket order, the numbers of both parties on a call are handed over, as is location data, call duration, unique identifiers, and the time and duration of all calls. The contents of the conversation itself are not covered.
The disclosure is likely to reignite longstanding debates in the US over the proper extent of the government’s domestic spying powers.
Under the Bush administration, officials in security agencies had disclosed to reporters the large-scale collection of call records data by the NSA, but this is the first time significant and top-secret documents have revealed the continuation of the practice on a massive scale under President Obama.
The unlimited nature of the records being handed over to the NSA is extremely unusual. Fisa court orders typically direct the production of records pertaining to a specific named target who is suspected of being an agent of a terrorist group or foreign state, or a finite set of individually named targets.
The Guardian approached the National Security Agency, the White House and the Department of Justice for comment in advance of publication on Wednesday. All declined. The agencies were also offered the opportunity to raise specific security concerns regarding the publication of the court order.
The court order expressly bars Verizon from disclosing to the public either the existence of the FBI’s request for its customers’ records, or the court order itself.
“We decline comment,” said Ed McFadden, a Washington-based Verizon spokesman.
The order, signed by Judge Roger Vinson, compels Verizon to produce to the NSA electronic copies of “all call detail records or ‘telephony metadata’ created by Verizon for communications between the United States and abroad” or “wholly within the United States, including local telephone calls”.
The order directs Verizon to “continue production on an ongoing daily basis thereafter for the duration of this order”. It specifies that the records to be produced include “session identifying information”, such as “originating and terminating number”, the duration of each call, telephone calling card numbers, trunk identifiers, International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) number, and “comprehensive communication routing information”.
The information is classed as “metadata”, or transactional information, rather than communications, and so does not require individual warrants to access. The document also specifies that such “metadata” is not limited to the aforementioned items. A 2005 court ruling judged that cell site location data – the nearest cell tower a phone was connected to – was also transactional data, and so could potentially fall under the scope of the order.
While the order itself does not include either the contents of messages or the personal information of the subscriber of any particular cell number, its collection would allow the NSA to build easily a comprehensive picture of who any individual contacted, how and when, and possibly from where, retrospectively.
It is not known whether Verizon is the only cell-phone provider to be targeted with such an order, although previous reporting has suggested the NSA has collected cell records from all major mobile networks. It is also unclear from the leaked document whether the three-month order was a one-off, or the latest in a series of similar orders.
The court order appears to explain the numerous cryptic public warnings by two US senators, Ron Wyden and Mark Udall, about the scope of the Obama administration’s surveillance activities.
For roughly two years, the two Democrats have been stridently advising the public that the US government is relying on “secret legal interpretations” to claim surveillance powers so broad that the American public would be “stunned” to learn of the kind of domestic spying being conducted.
Because those activities are classified, the senators, both members of the Senate intelligence committee, have been prevented from specifying which domestic surveillance programs they find so alarming. But the information they have been able to disclose in their public warnings perfectly tracks both the specific law cited by the April 25 court order as well as the vast scope of record-gathering it authorized.
Julian Sanchez, a surveillance expert with the Cato Institute, explained: “We’ve certainly seen the government increasingly strain the bounds of ‘relevance’ to collect large numbers of records at once — everyone at one or two degrees of separation from a target but vacuuming all metadata up indiscriminately would be an extraordinary repudiation of any pretence of constraint or particularized suspicion.” The April order requested by the FBI and NSA does precisely that.
The law on which the order explicitly relies is the so-called “business records” provision of the Patriot Act, 50 USC section 1861. That is the provision which Wyden and Udall have repeatedly cited when warning the public of what they believe is the Obama administration’s extreme interpretation of the law to engage in excessive domestic surveillance.
In a letter to attorney general Eric Holder last year, they argued that “there is now a significant gap between what most Americans think the law allows and what the government secretly claims the law allows.”
“We believe,” they wrote, “that most Americans would be stunned to learn the details of how these secret court opinions have interpreted” the “business records” provision of the Patriot Act.
Privacy advocates have long warned that allowing the government to collect and store unlimited “metadata” is a highly invasive form of surveillance of citizens’ communications activities. Those records enable the government to know the identity of every person with whom an individual communicates electronically, how long they spoke, and their location at the time of the communication.
Such metadata is what the US government has long attempted to obtain in order to discover an individual’s network of associations and communication patterns. The request for the bulk collection of all Verizon domestic telephone records indicates that the agency is continuing some version of the data-mining program begun by the Bush administration in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attack.
The NSA, as part of a program secretly authorized by President Bush on 4 October 2001, implemented a bulk collection program of domestic telephone, internet and email records. A furore erupted in 2006 when USA Today reported that the NSA had “been secretly collecting the phone call records of tens of millions of Americans, using data provided by AT&T, Verizon and BellSouth” and was “using the data to analyze calling patterns in an effort to detect terrorist activity.” Until now, there has been no indication that the Obama administration implemented a similar program.
These recent events reflect how profoundly the NSA’s mission has transformed from an agency exclusively devoted to foreign intelligence gathering, into one that focuses increasingly on domestic communications. A 30-year employee of the NSA, William Binney, resigned from the agency shortly after 9/11 in protest at the agency’s focus on domestic activities.
In the mid-1970s, Congress, for the first time, investigated the surveillance activities of the US government. Back then, the mandate of the NSA was that it would never direct its surveillance apparatus domestically.
At the conclusion of that investigation, Frank Church, the Democratic senator from Idaho who chaired the investigative committee, warned: “The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything: telephone conversations, telegrams, it doesn’t matter.”
Additional reporting by Ewen MacAskill and Spencer Ackerman
http://m.guardiannews.com/world/2013/jun/06/nsa-phone-records-verizon-court-order
 

A big H/T to Dave for this article

The Guardian UK looks into Obama’s Verizon dragnet

NSA surveillance data-mining Verizon records

The Guardian UK reported:

Feinstein said she believed the order had been in place for some time. She said: “As far as I know this is the exact three-month renewal of what has been the case for the past seven years. This renewal is carried out by the [foreign intelligence surveillance] court under the business records section of the Patriot Act. Therefore it is lawful. It has been briefed to Congress.”

The Center for Constitutional Rights said in a statement that the secret court order was unprecedented. “As far as we know this order from the Fisa court is the broadest surveillance order to ever have been issued: it requires no level of suspicion and applies to all Verizon [business services] subscribers anywhere in the US.

“The Patriot Act’s incredibly broad surveillance provision purportedly authorizes an order of this sort, though its constitutionality is in question and several senators have complained about it.”

Russell Tice, a retired National Security Agency intelligence analyst and whistleblower, said: “What is going on is much larger and more systemic than anything anyone has ever suspected or imagined.”

Although an anonymous senior Obama administration official said that “on its face” the court order revealed by the Guardian did not authorise the government to listen in on people’s phone calls, Tice now believes the NSA has constructed such a capability.

“I figured it would probably be about 2015” before the NSA had “the computer capacity … to collect all digital communications word for word,” Tice said. “But I think I’m wrong. I think they have it right now.”

[*I did not include the link because of A/V problems with it.]

H/T to Dave

Spy Center Surrounded in Secrecy

Surprise Visitors Are Unwelcome At The NSA’s Unfinished Utah Spy Center (Especially When They Take Photos)


Welcome to Orwell’s 1984

3/04/2013 — Forbes.com
Most people who visit Salt Lake City in the winter months are excited about taking advantage of the area’s storied slopes. While skiing was on my itinerary last week, I was more excited about an offbeat tourism opportunity in the area: I wanted to check out the construction site for “the country’s biggest spy center.”

An electrifying piece about domestic surveillance by national security writer James Bamford that appeared in Wired last year read like a travel brochure to me:

“In the little town of Bluffdale, Big Love and Big Brother have become uneasy neighbors. Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. A project of immense secrecy, it is the final piece in a complex puzzle assembled over the past decade. Its purpose: to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks. The heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running in September 2013. Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.”

More at : http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2013/03/04/nsa-utah-data-center-visit/

NSA Whistleblower: “Every American Is Under Surveillance”

Thursday, 06 December 2012

“What I’ve been basically saying for quite some time, is that the FBI has access to the data collected, which is basically the emails of virtually everybody in the country,” NSA whistleblower William Binney affirmed in a recent interview with the Kremlin-funded news outlet Russia Today (RT). “And the FBI has access to it.”

Binney was asked by the Russian news outlet about whether domestic surveillance efforts have intensified since President Obama took office in 2008. He responded:

The change is it’s getting worse. They are doing more. He is supporting the building of the Bluffdale facility, which is over two billion dollars they are spending on storage room for data. That means that they are collecting a lot more now and need more storage for it. That facility by my calculations that I submitted to the court for the Electronic Frontiers Foundation against NSA would hold on the order of 5 zettabytes of data. Just that current storage capacity is being advertised on the web that you can buy. And that’s not talking about what they have in the near future.

The overall theme represented in Binney’s testimony seeks to protect the freedoms and liberties granted to Americans under the U.S. Constitution. “The central [U.S.] government defines what is right and wrong and whether or not they target you,” Binney concluded. “They are violating the foundation of this entire country … and they are not living up to the oath of office.”

Read at: http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/politics/item/13854-nsa-whistleblower-%E2%80%9Cevery-american-is-under-surveillance%E2%80%9D

An Old Paper (Background – old programs don’t die….):

Anticipating Homeland Security:Information Anxiety and the United States Commission on National Security/21stCentury

Jodi Dean

Although the IOA, headed by convicted felon John Poindexter, was later shut down, concern remained that the DHS would continue the IAO’s plans to integrate all available electronic information into a central database that could then be mined for patterns. In January2003, Senator Russ Feingold proposed the Data Mining Moratorium Act. Had it passed the act would have suspended all data-mining activities by the Departments of Defense and HomelandSecurity and required all federal agencies to report on data-mining programs in development or use within ninety days.

In a statement introducing the bill, Feingold noted, “Like manyAmericans, I was surprised to learn during the last few months that the Department of Defense has spent hundreds of millions of dollars developing a data-mining system called Total Information Awareness while permitting the progeny of Total Information Awareness to appear in places like the Department of Homeland Security.” As Feingold’s bill languished incommittee and funding for the IAO was eliminated, data-mining projects persisted, some under Defense Department black budgets, others deep in the maze of the Department of HomelandSecurity.

One such program developed within the DHS and continuing the work of the IAO is ADVISE—the Analysis, Dissemination, Visualization, Insight, and Semantic EnhancementProgram. ADVISE collects massive amounts of publicly available data (including purchasing,travel, and internet-accessing habits) cross references it with information gathered from intelligence and law enforcement, and searches for links and patterns. As reported by OMB Watch, “the technology will draw connections between persons, determining who is related towhom, who works with whom, who lives close to whom, and who is associated with what organization/s.” One’s first impressions of “homeland security,” then, should not be dismissed too quickly—suspicion is fully justified.

Read academic paper at: academia.edu/Anticipating_Homeland_Security

Wikipedia:

ADVISE (Analysis, Dissemination, Visualization, Insight, and Semantic Enhancement) is a research and development program within the United States Department of Homeland Security Threat and Vulnerability Testing and Assessment (TVTA) portfolio. It is reported to be developing a massive data mining system, which would collect and analyze data on everyone in the United States and perform a “threat analysis” of them.

The data can be everything from financial records, phone records, emails, blog entries, website searches, and any other electronic information that can be put into a computer system. The information is then analyzed, and used to monitor social threats such as community-forming, terrorism, political organizing, or crime.

ADVISE will possess the ability to store one quadrillion data entities.

The exact scope and degree of completion of the program is unclear. ADVISE is in the 2004-2006 Federal DHS Budget as a component of the $47 million TVTA program.

The program was officially scrapped in September 2007 after the agency’s internal Inspector General found that pilot testing of the system had been performed using data on real people without required privacy safeguards in place.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADVISE

 

Programs rear their heads and fade off the radar. Then another similar program appears again. By now these programs ought to be pretty familiar to lawmakers. They are determined. They are certainly building all this storage space. It’s the gestalt, stupid.

Related article: http://www.hereinreality.com/bigbrother.html

http://www.nndb.com/people/643/000025568/