Organized chaos

The description coming out of the media about Republicans is utter “chaos” or fractured body. Well, Chris Wallace described it as chaos when just last Sunday he lampooned Jason Chaffetz, who is one of the candidates for speaker. He hit him with every bomb-throwing question he could think of, namely government shutdown. Sure it was an attempt to skewer McCarthy’s competition. It was obvious to me anyway.

Now that McCarthy withdraws his name, they call it chaos and fractured. Most of the conservatives know the establishment does not give up any ground without a fight. And it has to be a formidable resistance to make that fight effective. That’s just the way it is. So these can be seen as significant but small victories for conservatives. Does it look chaotic? Does it look pretty? No, but it is what it is. I’d worry more if things were going smooth as butter — that would send a message.

I’d call it constructive chaos, if anything. Even if we haven’t seen real positive results yet, I still see it as constructive. If you want to believe in the process, you could say that.

So McCarthy steps aside and withdraws his name, to conservative applause. He then tweeted his kudos for Ryan, who also supported him. The last thing to do is: if we don’t want him, we don’t want him endorsing anyone else. (that’s the part establishment usually don’t get.) Now McCarthy tries to hang on to salvage his majority leader job.

So it’s only really chaos or turmoil — “in complete disarray” according to Chris Wallace — to media and to Democrats. Dems don’t like not knowing something, or not being able to choose for Republicans. Nor do they like this many candidates in the presidential race to confuse them.

The big problem, of course, is when you announce the person who succeeds Boehner, they will descend like vultures on him. Then the person’s 2016 election suddenly blows up into a mega race, with mega money. You have to wonder if any congressman wants that to happen as he is rolls into the campaign? Boehner ran from a safe seat in Ohio. Still it makes one’s race a target for the Democrats — something they are good at.

Virginia Congressman, Dave Brat, has initiated some general principles as something a new leader should sign on to. (facebook)

With that in mind, here are some key commitments that new leadership should be willing to make to ensure the American people are given a seat at the table, and that we are serving their best interests – not the wishes of Washington’s political class.

— Oversee a budget process that leads to a balanced budget, and enforce it through regular order.
— Facilitate free market reforms that replace Obamacare and get the federal government out of the health insurance mandate business.
— Make border security a top priority, and ensure that amnesty for illegal immigrants is off the table.
— Promote a limited government agenda, and encourage committees to look for ways to get government out of the way.
— Rein in presidential overreach and enforce the Constitutional separation of powers.
— Require bills brought to the floor have the support of the majority of the Republican conference.
— Ensure that members are allowed to vote in line with their conscience and with their constituents without fear of retaliation by leadership.

Now that is a start. What they call chaos can be a good thing, the way it works in markets.

Another one in the breach for the GOP House

Cantor sabotages conservatives in quest for speakership

FEE! Fie! Foe! Fum! I smell the blood of a speaker.

04/08/2014 | The Daily Caller

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is intentionally sidelining one of his own Republican committee chairmen — and the chairman’s attempts to pass conservative reforms — in order to better secure his own path to the speakership.

Informed sources in the House, Senate and outside groups tell The Daily Caller that a shift in leadership is going to come sooner than expected, and Cantor is fighting hard for the new spot.

Speaker of the House John Boehner will likely step down if the Republicans fail to take the Senate in 2014; and even if Republicans do win, the rumor is Boehner isn’t interested in sticking around in the unpopular gig for too long anyway. This leaves his top deputy, Cantor, in a strong position to succeed Boehner at the helm in the next two years, and Cantor’s aspirations for the speakership are obvious.

Cantor’s alleged target, House Financial Services Committee Chairman Rep. Jeb Hensarling, poses a rare threat to Cantor’s rise: He has strong conservative bona fides, once heading the conservative Republican Study Committee and often fighting for conservative reforms. He has also been around long enough – including serving as chairman of the House Republican Conference – to earn the respect of more moderate, “establishment” Republicans.

It’s not certain Hensarling even wants to be speaker, with sources close to him playing coy, but it’s clear to conservatives that Cantor sees his colleague as a threat to his rise.

“Hensarling appeals to conservatives, with maybe a slight apprehension that he’s not fire breathing anymore, but still a principled, trustworthy conservative,” a leading conservative Republican, who worked closely with Hensarling, told TheDC. “He also appeals to moderates, and is reasonable in how he runs his committee — he reaches across the aisle.”

Cantor’s strategy to sideline Hensarling begins with killing his policy initiatives, and robbing him of political successes. When Hensarling suggested reforms to flood insurance, Republican leadership bypassed him. His attempts to abolish Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have also been ignored — despite overwhelming outside support from conservative juggernauts like Heritage Action and Club for Growth.

“This is all 100 percent coming from Cantor,” one ranking Senate source with ties to the situation told TheDC, “and this is all angling for Boehner’s job. The case Cantor’s going to make is ‘I’m next in line.’ Hensarling may [otherwise] say ‘You’re next in line, but who’s doing all the work? Who’s the one passing all the bills? Who do you want to lead you, a conservative doing reform or a guy with wishy-washy bills?’”

Cantor, sources say, can and is neutering his career threat – especially the “passing all the bills” bit.

“That’s how I see it, personally,” the Hill officer who previously worked with Hensarling told TheDC. “That’s how a lot of folks in the Hensarling office see it.”

More The Daily Caller

Almost too sickening to read the play by play. There’s an ongoing battle. Cantor would not be happy if he is not the golden anointed one — if Boehner goes. And it looks natural that Boehner is going, one way or another. Not if but how soon?