Big Picture, Big Story

After Entering the Sphere of Influence in Investigation comes this second installment.

I think this is a big story. And I think Trump was right that it is a big story, bigger than people know. Home run, we got us a story here.

Obama NSC Adviser Admits Seeking Trump Aides Identities in Intel Reports

Rice denies engaging in improper political spying
BY: Bill Gertz | September 19, 2017 | Washington Free Beacon

Former Obama administration National Security Adviser Susan Rice told a House committee this month she requested the identities of Trump transition aides that were hidden in sensitive intelligence reports to protect Americans’ privacy rights.

Rice testified before a closed session of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Sept. 6 that she asked U.S. intelligence agencies for the names of Trump advisers to be unmasked in transcripts of communications intercepts.

Rice asked for names to be unmasked in a transcript of an electronic intercept involving a meeting between three senior Trump aides and a United Arab Emirates official who had traveled to the United States for an informal visit.

The three officials included candidate Donald Trump’s national security adviser, retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn; presidential campaign chief executive Steve Bannon; and Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, according to CNN, which first reported on Rice’s closed-door testimony.

Details of Rice’s testimony on the unmasking of Trump aides were made public Sept. 14, quoting unidentified government sources, and included comments from members of Congress who did not dispute the closed-door testimony.

Rice’s disclosures before the intelligence panel appear to contradict earlier statements she made asserting that she had no knowledge of the unmasking of Americans, the process of identifying the names of Americans who are protected by privacy laws and who are incidentally spied on during sensitive foreign electronic intelligence operations. …/

“I think the Susan Rice thing is a massive story. I think it’s a massive, massive story. All over the world,” Trump said, adding cryptically, “it’s a bigger story than you know.”

Rice’s testimony before the House committee is part of a committee investigation into allegations of improper intelligence gathering by the Obama administration, as well as Russian influence operations targeting the 2016 election.

“We know the unmasking investigation is moving forward, and that the intel committee has amassed a lot of information about it,” said one congressional official. “It seems like you had Obama officials doing this and thinking they wouldn’t get caught.”

Read: http://freebeacon.com/national-security/obama-nsc-adviser-admits-seeking-trump-aides-identities-intel-reports/

Maybe we knew or heard most of that before. The difference is context. No, it isn’t in the reporting or events. It seems the momentum has changed. Now, with Rice’s testimony, it is hard to overlook the obvious: that there was some surveillance at Trump Tower and that the names were suspiciously unmasked around the events of the campaign. So there was a meeting with a Saudi prince, which supposedly tripped Rice’s trigger to have to know everyone who was there. Or that is her excuse. Why? Your guess.

They only know everyone that was there, who is masked, because of surveillance. It is so blatantly political you cannot deny it, even if you wanted to. Then Rice refuses to say why she needed to know, saying it would involve classified information. If this is not worthy of investigation — why they were worried about all this — then what is worthy to know?

And now the people know too. See what changed was we were not supposed to get caught up in the how or why they got the information. We were just supposed to hear it trickled out from the Obama perspective, unquestioned. We were supposed to concentrate on their intentional outcome — not the means to it. Get it?

That makes all this smell more like the set up that it is. My explanation:

Maybe this investigation was loosely planned or not? At the least, the information was supposed to come out, somehow, at some point, to make Trump look bad. But it was to be by slight of hand, then passed right through so we couldn’t really question where it came from or how. Then we would be so busy in looking at its implications on Trump, shocked, to be bothered with the questionable means and/or their motives.

This, I believe, was cooked up some time ago. Before or right after election makes little difference. It may have been the ‘just in case plan.’ (JICP) Call it an insurance policy. In fact, they could have discovered enough info on the way they thought could be useful blackmail material. Maybe not a lot, just enough to cause major discomfort, or at least keep people answering questions as a distraction or diversion. But any information found along the way could be useful. The damage is in how the information is used, not whether it is damning or not. That is the weaponizing part. The time and purpose they used it for, the goal, would be up to them. But we would not be able to track down exactly where the information came from — not for a long time with a lot of effort.

That is where there was a problem. It didn’t unfold just the way it was supposed to. When Trump shot off a tweet about being wiretapped at the Trump Tower, it was like a canon going off around the world. We didn’t know why that was such a big deal, since it was obvious to most of us that there was some type of surveillance around Trump and the Trump Tower. We knew enough already. Maybe we didn’t know how deep it went, or who was involved, but we knew it took place. It interrupted the plot. Any incoming Republican would have faced the same thing.

Their problem was Trump pulled the trigger calling it out, untimely as it was, which set off a sequence of events and reactions to his accusation. That began the ball rolling, even though they mocked and attacked him for having said it.

He was not to be so bold as make that claim. It didn’t fit their plans. Then, surely, no one was supposed to believe it anyway. So it went on for weeks, as they tried to put Trump’s charge to bed quickly and permanently. (they: Democrats, Left, media and Obamafiles) It mostly did work; they tamped it down where only people brought it up to mock Trump’s ridiculous assertion. even demanding apologies. That started to screw things up.

That was about the time we were hearing Obama was traveling the globe and kite surfing somewhere in the Caribbean. So statements came out from Ben Rhodes and others calling wiretapping preposterous. But why wouldn’t Obama and his cronies be willing to spy on Trump, especially after he won, when they had been willing to do most anything during the campaign to aid Hillary? Why stop now when it is even more critical to them?

SO their loose plans were interrupted, inconveniently. And they couldn’t put the lid back on it. Suddenly the public outrage kicked up saying ‘wait a minute, he was under some kind of surveillance.’ We already knew that much. Remember how nasty they got in denials?

Now people were questioning the means of the information, not just whether Trump did something. Ah oh. People wanted that investigated with the other. Well, that wasn’t in the script at all. Actually, that was the one thing that could not be worked into their script. It messed everything up when it looks as if there was some agenda all along against Trump. No, they wanted us to only see a Russia agenda. (just as they did during the campaign.)

Anything else was very inconvenient. Must demonize Trump. Put him down and keep him down. Delegitimize him. But do not expose their creative, political, informational techniques. It usually does come down to narrative to the left. When they can control the narrative, they are ahead. But interrupt or change their narrative, they have a problem.

This was a big shift exposing the corrupt means, machinery, behind their Russia narrative. Like in Wizard of Oz, we weren’t supposed to see that part. That changes their whole story line. We were supposed to see the what, not the how or why. It blew up their plot.

The same applies to the Mueller and company. The investigation was to justify itself. The fact that they got a special counsel established — not the how or why — was supposed to convey legitimate authority for it and perception of “must be some wrong doing” then. Democrats and media touted that it exists therefore is justified — or else it wouldn’t.

The same rules, or lack of, also applied to Manafort’s no-knock raid. “If they got that warrant then it was justified.” If FISA or any judge issued it, there were legitimate grounds. And we certainly need not know why. The process is supposed to justify itself.

The same faulty premises applied to the surveillance. If there was surveillance, then obviously it must have been (a)legal and (b) justified by its existence alone. Never mind the reason. Which, in the case of Democrats, an outgoing president, a radicalized administration and party, after a terrible election loss, is entirely questionable.

Especially if the entire basis for said investigation is due to Democrats losing the election — or Trump winning. Never mind all the shenanigans that happened repeatedly on the left.

Therefore, it makes it easy for them to say any surveillance would have to be justified — or it wouldn’t have happened. See this is the way of using the process, corrupted as it is, to justify all their misconduct. That process and their creativity using it, is not to be questioned in any way, according to Dems. ‘Trust us.’ Then, as a backdoor guardian, if anyone can explain or sell this way of thinking, it would be media — their chief ally.

Meanwhile, let’s also pretend not to have noticed what is really taking place in front of us: the complete litigation of the election and outcome of it.

Right Ring | Bullright

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Ripples in a world of news

Leaked Docs Show UK’s Spy Bill Would Force Internet Providers To Track People In Real Time

A draft of a proposed new surveillance law in the U.K. leaked Thursday shows the country’s government wants the power to force internet service providers (ISPs) to give up people’s communications in real time.

The Investigatory Powers Bill, colloquially known as the “snoopers’ charter,” originally passed under the helm of the Conservative Party in November.

Read Daily Caller

Other world news

Venezuela — NBC News

In cities around the country there are reports of political unrest by day and shootouts and looting at night. Scenes include students and housewives armed with sticks and rocks, confronting National Guard troops with anti-riot gear using tear gas, water cannons and other weapons to beat back crowds.

Does any of that sound vaguely familiar?

Who knew El Chapo Guzman had a wife who is an American citizen, with twin girls? Just consider those thoughts for a moment. – NBC News

Susan Rice center of Unmasking-gate

Washington Free Beacon

Susan Rice, former President Barack Obama’s national security adviser, reportedly requested on several occasions the identities of “masked” U.S. persons in intelligence reports linked to President Trump’s transition and campaign. The revelation contradicts Rice’s past comments on March 22, when she claimed she knew “nothing” about the intelligence reports.

White House lawyers discovered Rice’s dozens of requests last month, during a National Security Council review of the “government’s policy on ‘unmasking’ the identities of individuals in the U.S. who are not targets of electronic eavesdropping, but whose communications are collected incidentally,” Eli Lake of Bloomberg reported Monday, citing U.S. officials.

But Rice, who Newsweek once called Obama’s “right-hand woman,” denied during a PBS interview last month having any knowledge of the intelligence community’s alleged incidental surveillance of Trump’s transition team.

http://freebeacon.com/national-security/flashback-susan-rice-said-i-know-nothing-unmasking-trump-officials/

Why does that make perfect sense?

The person who in 2012 told every major news network that a video caused the Benghazi attack. Obama’s Legacy of Lies’ right-hand deceiver.

S-O’l Obama Hypocrite – 3

The dancing hypocrite takes his show to the stage – part 3 [See Part 1]

Obama did Jay Leno to roll out his thoughts on national security, Benghazi, and embassy closings. Did someone move the press room to NBC studios?…

In this episode, we find Hypobama deeply engrossed in the NSA which has grown into a dragnet.

Recap: After explaining in the last episode how we had the proper reactions to terrorism like the Boston bombing, with our super-resilience abilities, and how we do not let a little terrorism shut us down, he now explains why we are wrong about NSA and our concerns about the increasing dragnet of phone records and FISA courts vacuuming up our information. But yet we’re right, somehow, for having concerns about them, even if our concerns are not substantiated — if that makes any sense.

Q: It’s safe to say that we learned about these threats through the NSA intelligence program? Is that a fair assessment?
THE PRESIDENT: Well, this intelligence-gathering that we do is a critical component of counterterrorism. And obviously, with Mr. Snowden and the disclosures of classified information, this raised a lot of questions for people. But what I said as soon as it happened I continue to believe in, which is a lot of these programs were put in place before I came in. I had some skepticism, and I think we should have a healthy skepticism about what government is doing. I had the programs reviewed. We put in some additional safeguards to make sure that there’s federal court oversight as well as congressional oversight, that there is no spying on Americans.
We don’t have a domestic spying program. What we do have are some mechanisms where we can track a phone number or an email address that we know is connected to some sort of terrorist threat. And that information is useful. But what I’ve said before I want to make sure I repeat, and that is we should be skeptical about the potential encroachments on privacy. None of the revelations show that government has actually abused these powers, but they’re pretty significant powers.
And I’ve been talking to Congress and civil libertarians and others about are there additional ways that we can make sure that people know nobody is listening to your phone call, but we do want to make sure that after a Boston bombing, for example, we’ve got the phone numbers of those two brothers — we want to be able to make sure did they call anybody else? Are there networks in New York, are there networks elsewhere that we have to roll up? And if we can make sure that there’s confidence on the part of the American people that there’s oversight, then I think we can make sure that we’re properly balancing our liberty and our security.

Oh, he’s been talking to civil libertarians? I bet their phones are ringing off the hook.(pardon the pun) He mentioned that again in his speech days later. Who is he talking to? He hasn’t offered one name. He can’t.

If the NSA techniques are so instrumental, how did it fail on the Boston bombers? Now he wants to use the very attacks that happened on his watch, and that sordid course of events, from Benghazi to the Boston bombing, to justify the program.

“…put in place before I came in. I had some skepticism.” (as he rings the Bush bell)
Its amazing that he has critics all over the place and how he tries to run out in front of the parade of criticism against him. What hypocrisy. He’s taken these policies to new heights, as a dragnet. Sometimes you cannot be on both sides. Oh, now that he has no criticism of NSA no one else should? (and his credibility is excellent)

If we can make sure there’s confidence on the part of the American people that there’s oversight” ? Well, having results to justify it would help. Did it really help? I’m not even sure the legitimate, inter-government phone calls from Benghazi were responded to correctly. But they did get all those calls.

Please, do tell us about the need for congressional oversight. I’ll be waiting.
Make the case and make my day!

The real point is how this government responds or doesn’t to threats, namely to terrorism in general. So the problem is not that they don’t have access to enough information. Benghazi showed that. It’s not just what they have access to but what they do with it.

We do not know if they are going to abuse or extort the information against us, or only apply it to pursue terrorists. Pandora’s box is opened. Look what they did at IRS.

I don’t know of a department of the federal government Obama has not politicized. What information do they not have access to? Companies are turning over passwords and user names. Is he making the case for that?

Let’s summarize: If he can only convince us to have “confidence”, then we “properly balanced our liberty and our security”. That is his basic message. We just need to be convinced to have confidence. Remember that hope theme?

NSA renews its collection operation

Court renews NSA telephone surveillance program

Kevin Johnson, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — The secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court renewed the government’s authority Friday to continue the collection of millions of Americans’ telephone records, one of the classified counter-terrorism programs disclosed by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.
In an unusual public statement, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence acknowledged that the court renewed the authority that was set to expire Friday.
“In light of the significant and continuing public interest in the …collection program, the DNI has decided to declassify and disclose publicly that the government filed an application with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court seeking renewal of the authority to collect telephony metadata in bulk, and that the court renewed that authority,” the statement said.
Earlier this week, Democrat and Republican lawmakers expressed deep concerns about the scope of the surveillance program and suggested that Congress may not renew legislative authority for it when it comes up for review in nearly two years.
“This is unsustainable, outrageous and must be stopped immediately,” Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., told Justice and intelligence officials at a Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday.
Said Alabama Republican Rep. Spencer Bachus: “How do we keep this from evolving into an unchecked weapons that can be used against people’s rights?”
Snowden has been charged with espionage related offenses for disclosing the program and a separate operation that tracks the communications of non-U.S. citizens abroad. He has been in a Moscow airport weighing various asylum strategies to avoid extradition to the United States

Funny how on the day the FISA court renews it, Obama comes out to give a race lecture on Trayvon Martin.

When I read the statement it just rubs salt in the wound. No changes but they decided to make it public that they are doing it.

So they announce that they are collecting data “in bulk”, after lying. First, Clapper said “no” they are not. “Not wittingly,” he said. “There are cases where they could inadvertently perhaps collect, but not wittingly.”

Now he breezes though it as business of usual and makes no bones about it. He flaunts the renewal to the public. Everything Clapper does just makes me grit my teeth.

So we finally got to the very real “wittingly”, intentional part. Now they drop the pretense. It happens to be on a Friday, when Obama runs out to talk about Trayvon Martin. Then media gushes over his comments. (but then that is business as usual)

Snowden’s faith in Obama was rocked

Snowden had ‘faith’ in Obama, but was disappointed

By JENNIFER EPSTEIN — Politico

6/17/13

 Edward Snowden says he decided to release classified information about national security surveillance after President Obama failed to live up to his 2008 campaign promises.

“Obama’s campaign promises and election gave me faith that he would lead us toward fixing the problems he outlined in his quest for votes,” Snowden said in a Monday question-and-answer session with readers of The Guardian. “Many Americans felt similarly.”

“Unfortunately,” he continued, “shortly after assuming power, [Obama] closed the door on investigating systemic violations of law, deepened and expanded several abusive programs, and refused to spend the political capital to end the kind of human rights violations like we see in Guantanamo, where men still sit without charge.” 

Sounds like that snowball of Snowden’s turned into a boulder, sitting on his shoulder.
And Obama’s ‘campaign blame’ is getting a dose of his own medicine.

Big–Bro just got a whole lot smarter

News articles are surfacing that Google, in partnership with NASA, has acquired a new super computer from D-Wave, a Canadian based company.

Its called a quantum computer with specs only a geek might understand. But I think anyone with brain cells should be able to understand the significance of it.

*Google is the front end to the NSA spying network. (and also involved with Obama’s campaign efforts) Why would a publicly held company Google team up with a government agency (NASA) and buy a quantum computer? Quantum computers have self-learning potential and become smarter using quantum algorithms, which run faster than any possible probabilistic classical algorithm. The end result is humans will no longer be needed to capture data OR analyze it. Quantum computers can do all this on their own.

Maybe its a marriage of fate? Artificial intelligence is the goal and destination.

*This can eliminate the pesky problem government faces with whistle blowers (I.E. Edward Snowden et al, those before him). The government now has a much more efficient way of keeping their massive data collection hidden from the general public and also the organizations whose job is to ensure the government does not break any constitutional laws.

First is a video that was posted by Natural News, a chilling radio discussion.
(also see their other report) Google purchased it.

Second, a piece from CNN talking about D-Wave NASA connection

Even CNN reported on it. Of course,they lightly touch on the many concerns about privacy and pretty much ignore the cozy relationship with NSA. This is CNN interviewing an expert about the quantum purchase related to the Google/NASA partnership.

It wasn’t until the end when they finally considered privacy concerns, as  sort of an afterthought, that the analyst described the use and was compelled to say “hopefully, Google will use it as a force for good”. Ah, now that’s a relief. And if not?… Remind me to check back with these bright analysts.

By the way, these pictures of rocks on Mars may be really neat, but there is plenty more they can do with quantum capabilities than space travel and taking pictures.
birdshaped rock Rock photo 2

The type of computing it does especially pertains to the security area of data collecting and breaking communications. The ultimate goal of simulated or artificial intelligence. Of course, the analyst hopes they use its capabilities for good. But maybe we have to reexamine the term “good” too, like everything else they do. As I read the information to date, it will be growing exponentially in capacity over the next few years.

 

So where is this tin foil-plagued administration?

Last year Obama rolled out a big data initiative. With the enormous collection of data they now do, analysis of that data is a challenge. Enter the need for super computers and storage to feed their insatiable appetite to know as much as they can in real-time about Americans. (now that the genie is out of the bottle)

The Daily Caller had an interview with former NSA analyst William Binney, who has been sounding the alarm for over a decade, where he described their vacuum operation of pretty much everything communication-wise, and of an estimated 80% of what goes up on the web. Hence the need for analysis.

Binney: That’s my point. When you ask how much damage these leaks have done to our capability, they’ve actually done absolutely nothing. The terrorists were monitoring all of this information anyway, so they had a pretty good idea of what was being collected. So, who are we keeping this from? It’s not the terrorists. We are really keeping it from the American public. Because that’s who they’re collecting data about. And that’s who they’re keeping it secret from. The terrorists already knew all this stuff.

The President’s Data Initiatives last year is data mining on steroids, or quantum style.
Obama’s initiative is chuck full of a wish list catering to those needs:

“Accelerating and expanding efforts to make government information resources more publicly accessible in “computer-readable” form and spurring the use of those data by entrepreneurs as fuel for the creation of new products, services, and jobs.”

Note the spin on terms of use being for entrepreneurs and jobs. All of it is built around data mining. Yea and the educational goals and jobs, but the real focus is on the information of Americans. Like a kid in a toy store or candy shop, he suggests all the different possible ventures. All of it interdependent on this information. Prism is only part of the collection resources: with ObamaCare, medical, the IRS, phone and data communications, just as all the helpful “sign up” programs were instrumental to Obama’s data mining operation since his first campaign.

Government sets itself up as the keeper of all information, especially all the personal information it can get its greedy hands on. (they probably know about that birthmark) Wow, what it can do with that information – for your benefit of course. As if we cannot wait to be tracked in every move. Then its sharing capacity for all the new uses it can find for that information. Privacy be damned.

They believe in privacy for killing a baby in the womb, but for everything else, you get the probing “public eye”. How’s that colonoscopy working out for you? Eat more broccoli.

Listen to the words of Obama’s sales pitch about the vast “Initiatives” program:

The Open Data Initiatives project is “liberating” government data and voluntarily-contributed corporate data to fuel entrepreneurship, create jobs, and improve the lives of Americans in tangible ways. As a model, decades ago, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began making weather data available for free electronic download by anyone. Entrepreneurs used these data to create weather newscasts, websites, mobile applications, insurance, and much more. Similarly, the government’s decision to make the Global Positioning System (GPS) freely available has fueled a vast array of private-sector innovations ranging from navigation systems to precision crop farming, creating massive public benefit and contributing significantly to economic growth. More recently, the Health Data Initiative, launched by the Institute of Medicine and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2010, has opened growing amounts of health-related knowledge and information in computer-readable form from the vaults of the government and publicized the availability of these data to entrepreneurs and innovators. Hundreds of companies and nonprofits have used these data to develop new products and services that are helping millions of Americans and creating jobs of the future in the process. Working closely with the US Chief Technology Officer, the US Chief Information Officer, and an array of agencies, the Open Data Initiatives team has launched and is continuing to scale open data efforts in Health, Energy, Education, Finance, Public Safety, and Global Development. These efforts involve government releasing general data resources in computer-readable form and in accordance with policies that rigorously protect privacy. The goal is to stimulate a rising tide of private-sector entrepreneurship that leverages these data to create tools that help Americans find the right health care provider for them, identify the college that provides the best value for their money, save money on their electricity bills through smarter shopping for the right rate plan, keep their families safe by knowing which products have been recalled, and much more – a rising tide of innovation that also contributes to economic growth and creates jobs.

Oh yes, it’s all to help you. Pay no mind to all the information sharing capability and big-brother collection resources that make all that possible. Welcome to ‘Big Brother 3.0, quantum scale. It’s what his initiative is really all about, big government.

But he is not done:

For Round 2, we are looking for Presidential Innovation Fellows to work on the existing Open Data Initiatives in Health, Energy, Education, Finance, Public Safety, and Global Development, as well as the following new data innovation efforts: [building virtual learning etc etc]

They have quite the appetite, don’t they? I’m sure it is educational learning they are concerned with.

Yes, Jane, you can kill your baby in the warm auspices of “privacy rights” under the federal government’s fiat law, just don’t try to opt out of the governmental data (abuse) system….it won’t be their hard drive that fails. But Obama vows to “fight” for your abortion right and free contraceptives.

Note how they always refer to it as “government data”. Government is the hub for it, I’ll grant them that. It all becomes government data. Funny how it transforms itself from private personal data into government data to market and extort. And then the pitch: ‘look how helpful all this will be to you.’ Sorry, it makes me want to hurl listening to their rosy vision of an America under super-surveillance, and how beneficial that all is to us serfs.

*Big-Brother just got so much smarter that little brother isn’t even needed anymore. Anyone ever seen the movie “Terminator”?

Some people are already calling it Skynet. Maybe the Skynet is befalling you, and that isn’t Chicken Little?

* with added collaboration from Dave- h/t

Resources: Natural News, Obama’s open data initiatives, William Binney/Daily Caller
Related: Breitbart: Maxine Waters reveals Obamas database w/ voters private info.
previous: Big Brother is in the house… ; Spy Center Surrounded in Secrecy
https://rightring.wordpress.com/2013/06/24/unsecure-in-papers-and-possessions/

unSecure in Papers and Possessions

All the talk is about information collection, sharing, government spying, and storage of that personal information — privacy be damned. Okay, the NSA and government apologists parse that down to identifiable information.

They claim that the collection of everyone’s’ phone records is generic unidentifiable information so it can safely be used, abused, extorted and pilfered for content, to their hearts’ content. I have a little bit of a problem with that.

See, in the fourth amendment it does not guarantee you the right to be secure in only your “identifiable” information. So now you can reasonably expect to be secure in your person and possessions, but only if they are identifiable to you. That’s the message.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

They will admit that if one looks hard enough at this information it leads to the identity of a person. But they assure us that our identity is protected. My identity is not ALL I’m concerned about. So it’s as if when your name is removed, that information is no longer yours — then it can belong to anyone.(just because it cannot be traceable to you) But it doesn’t, it still belongs to me. Someone generated or created it, and that someone is me.

Now tell me I’m supposed to be comforted by their using and pilfering my information. That starts to not make sense to me.

They do similar things to medical records and call them non-identifiable medical information. This is like claiming if they remove your name from the DNA then it is not your DNA anymore. Get it? I don’t think this game of hoodwink is what the authors of the DOI and the Constitution’s Bill of Right’s had in mind.

My right to be secure in my papers and possessions is not limited to those with my name or identifiable information on them. It’s nice you say you are going to lengths to spare my identity from being extorted for some purpose, but just because you make it unidentifiable does not mean it’s not mine.

There is a word for that in other areas of law, like fraud and theft. People scratch names and serial numbers off things to hide the real owners’ identity and extort the property for what they can. That would be fraud and theft, by deception. But when our government does it, we are supposed to appreciate it because they are protecting our identity.

They’ve made it about identity. They have us believe that identity is key to my right to be secure in my papers and property. Someone actually made and placed that call from the corner of Broad and Jefferson. But if we pretend we don’t know who made it then it is fair game for the government and for any purposes anyone wants to use it. Or any purposes government allows it to be used, which is more the point.

They reinterpret a few words in the Constitution(Kelo) and voila, your property is up for grabs to the highest bidder or crony to those in political power. But your property is what they have their designs on. You may own it, at the discretion and will of powers that be.

So those papers that do not have my name on them are, well, not really mine anymore. A few key strokes can make my information a public commodity or useful tool. In that case, I am tasked with the burden to prove they are mine, something like proving your innocence. If someone removed my name and account number from a bank, that money belongs to me. Except now I just have the burden to prove its mine. And if they are that good creative at this shell game, then what could they do with finance?

All this while they can’t protect the records or identities of military putting their lives on the line for our rights.

Big Brother is in the house…

Huelskamp: Government Surveillance Like ‘Big Brother’

Friday, 07 Jun 2013 — Newsmax

By Jim Meyers and John Bachman

Rep. Tim Huelskamp tells Newsmax that revelations about the government’s surveillance operations are “astonishing” — and calls the federal government “Big Brother.”

The Kansas Republican also says it is “pretty evident” that Attorney General Eric Holder and people at the IRS have lied to Congress.

Rep. Huelskamp was first elected in 2010 and ran unopposed in 2012. He is a member of the Tea Party Caucus.

Members of Congress as well as ordinary citizens have been stunned by disclosures about a secret government intelligence operation targeting millions of Americans’ phone, email, and Internet records as a tool to fight terrorism.

“There are things going on here that are particularly worrisome,” Huelskamp says in an exclusive interview with Newsmax TV on Friday.

“This is not targeted to suspected terrorists, this is anybody who uses the phone in this country or uses YouTube or Apple or Skype.

“You know as we speak here there’s a record being made somewhere in Washington that we actually called one another on this phone line. That has never been indicated to me, and most of my colleagues are probably completely unaware that the administration was engaged in this type of monitoring of American citizens.

“It is shocking that we’re relying on media sources for this to be released – a British newspaper and now finally some newspapers here in this country.

“There are some folks that are claiming they were fully aware in Congress that this was going on. I was not one of them. I certainly would not have voted for the Patriot Act knowing they were pulling down hundreds of millions of phone records and categorizing and keeping them somewhere in Washington, D.C.

“I don’t trust them with the information. They’ve got a long history of leaking data as indicated by these news reports. So we will have a closed door session with the NSA and other folks on Monday and hopefully we’ll start getting some answers on this, but this is astonishing and this has never been revealed to me or most members of Congress.”

Asked about the “leaking,” Huelskamp says: “Data in the federal government has been notoriously open to hacking. I serve on the Veterans Affairs Committee. We just discovered earlier this week that up to 20 million private medical and financial data records of veterans in this country have been hacked, potentially by a Chinese-related company.

“These are the same folks that are supposedly protecting all of our telephone records that they have taken without permission and without warrant, we believe. So I’m worried about them having that information — number one, what are they going to do with it, but also who else might access that information when you have a government that can’t even protect records of veterans?”

The Department of Homeland Security “was supposedly watching the data at the VA and we know that they don’t know what they’ve lost. We know Chinese hackers went inside the system. I just say that Americans are very upset that the federal government, Washington, Big Brother, can come in here and take a look at all their phone records.

More: http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/huelskamp-government-surveillance-big/2013/06/07/id/508754?s=al&promo_code=13C49-1#ixzz2VgcMYcqr

Wyden questions Clapper

At the end of that exchange is where Clapper gives his now famous answer

Wyden asked: Does the NSA collect ANY type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans.

Clapper responds: “ No Sir. …Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect but not wittingly.”

So as if by some freak accident, they could ”inadvertently collect” data. A court order is pretty big inadvertent. I suppose “perhaps” they just stumbled across a court authorized order and thereby are collecting all the data… all by some accident of course.

You have to laugh that this is the director of intelligence. He earlier tried to hand off questions directed at him to Mueller in FBI.

This Verizon dragnet is the biggest inadvertent data collection that I think I ever heard of. A historic first.

This isn’t one of those “depends on the definition of IS” questions. I am struck then on how much unwitting data collection they are doing. Almost like, maybe, they were intentionally trying to do it? I know that sounds ridiculous, and I apologize.

The point in this is not about the data-collection issue, it is about lying. That would be intentionally not telling the truth, for anyone unsure. There used to be another word….

If Clapper lied about data collection, what are the chances he can lie about them keeping “dossiers” on millions of people? NSA called that a false claim.

NSA collecting phone records of millions of Verizon customers daily (Guardian)

[Guardian]Exclusive: Top secret court order requiring Verizon to hand over all call data shows scale of domestic surveillance under Obama

Under the terms of the order, the numbers of both parties on a call are handed over, as is location data and the time and duration of all calls.

Glenn Greenwald

The National Security Agency is currently collecting the telephone records of millions of US customers of Verizon, one of America’s largest telecoms providers, under a top secret court order issued in April.
The order, a copy of which has been obtained by the Guardian, requires Verizon on an “ongoing, daily basis” to give the NSA information on all telephone calls in its systems, both within the US and between the US and other countries.
The document shows for the first time that under the Obama administration the communication records of millions of US citizens are being collected indiscriminately and in bulk – regardless of whether they are suspected of any wrongdoing.
The secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (Fisa) granted the order to the FBI on April 25, giving the government unlimited authority to obtain the data for a specified three-month period ending on July 19.
Under the terms of the blanket order, the numbers of both parties on a call are handed over, as is location data, call duration, unique identifiers, and the time and duration of all calls. The contents of the conversation itself are not covered.
The disclosure is likely to reignite longstanding debates in the US over the proper extent of the government’s domestic spying powers.
Under the Bush administration, officials in security agencies had disclosed to reporters the large-scale collection of call records data by the NSA, but this is the first time significant and top-secret documents have revealed the continuation of the practice on a massive scale under President Obama.
The unlimited nature of the records being handed over to the NSA is extremely unusual. Fisa court orders typically direct the production of records pertaining to a specific named target who is suspected of being an agent of a terrorist group or foreign state, or a finite set of individually named targets.
The Guardian approached the National Security Agency, the White House and the Department of Justice for comment in advance of publication on Wednesday. All declined. The agencies were also offered the opportunity to raise specific security concerns regarding the publication of the court order.
The court order expressly bars Verizon from disclosing to the public either the existence of the FBI’s request for its customers’ records, or the court order itself.
“We decline comment,” said Ed McFadden, a Washington-based Verizon spokesman.
The order, signed by Judge Roger Vinson, compels Verizon to produce to the NSA electronic copies of “all call detail records or ‘telephony metadata’ created by Verizon for communications between the United States and abroad” or “wholly within the United States, including local telephone calls”.
The order directs Verizon to “continue production on an ongoing daily basis thereafter for the duration of this order”. It specifies that the records to be produced include “session identifying information”, such as “originating and terminating number”, the duration of each call, telephone calling card numbers, trunk identifiers, International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) number, and “comprehensive communication routing information”.
The information is classed as “metadata”, or transactional information, rather than communications, and so does not require individual warrants to access. The document also specifies that such “metadata” is not limited to the aforementioned items. A 2005 court ruling judged that cell site location data – the nearest cell tower a phone was connected to – was also transactional data, and so could potentially fall under the scope of the order.
While the order itself does not include either the contents of messages or the personal information of the subscriber of any particular cell number, its collection would allow the NSA to build easily a comprehensive picture of who any individual contacted, how and when, and possibly from where, retrospectively.
It is not known whether Verizon is the only cell-phone provider to be targeted with such an order, although previous reporting has suggested the NSA has collected cell records from all major mobile networks. It is also unclear from the leaked document whether the three-month order was a one-off, or the latest in a series of similar orders.
The court order appears to explain the numerous cryptic public warnings by two US senators, Ron Wyden and Mark Udall, about the scope of the Obama administration’s surveillance activities.
For roughly two years, the two Democrats have been stridently advising the public that the US government is relying on “secret legal interpretations” to claim surveillance powers so broad that the American public would be “stunned” to learn of the kind of domestic spying being conducted.
Because those activities are classified, the senators, both members of the Senate intelligence committee, have been prevented from specifying which domestic surveillance programs they find so alarming. But the information they have been able to disclose in their public warnings perfectly tracks both the specific law cited by the April 25 court order as well as the vast scope of record-gathering it authorized.
Julian Sanchez, a surveillance expert with the Cato Institute, explained: “We’ve certainly seen the government increasingly strain the bounds of ‘relevance’ to collect large numbers of records at once — everyone at one or two degrees of separation from a target but vacuuming all metadata up indiscriminately would be an extraordinary repudiation of any pretence of constraint or particularized suspicion.” The April order requested by the FBI and NSA does precisely that.
The law on which the order explicitly relies is the so-called “business records” provision of the Patriot Act, 50 USC section 1861. That is the provision which Wyden and Udall have repeatedly cited when warning the public of what they believe is the Obama administration’s extreme interpretation of the law to engage in excessive domestic surveillance.
In a letter to attorney general Eric Holder last year, they argued that “there is now a significant gap between what most Americans think the law allows and what the government secretly claims the law allows.”
“We believe,” they wrote, “that most Americans would be stunned to learn the details of how these secret court opinions have interpreted” the “business records” provision of the Patriot Act.
Privacy advocates have long warned that allowing the government to collect and store unlimited “metadata” is a highly invasive form of surveillance of citizens’ communications activities. Those records enable the government to know the identity of every person with whom an individual communicates electronically, how long they spoke, and their location at the time of the communication.
Such metadata is what the US government has long attempted to obtain in order to discover an individual’s network of associations and communication patterns. The request for the bulk collection of all Verizon domestic telephone records indicates that the agency is continuing some version of the data-mining program begun by the Bush administration in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attack.
The NSA, as part of a program secretly authorized by President Bush on 4 October 2001, implemented a bulk collection program of domestic telephone, internet and email records. A furore erupted in 2006 when USA Today reported that the NSA had “been secretly collecting the phone call records of tens of millions of Americans, using data provided by AT&T, Verizon and BellSouth” and was “using the data to analyze calling patterns in an effort to detect terrorist activity.” Until now, there has been no indication that the Obama administration implemented a similar program.
These recent events reflect how profoundly the NSA’s mission has transformed from an agency exclusively devoted to foreign intelligence gathering, into one that focuses increasingly on domestic communications. A 30-year employee of the NSA, William Binney, resigned from the agency shortly after 9/11 in protest at the agency’s focus on domestic activities.
In the mid-1970s, Congress, for the first time, investigated the surveillance activities of the US government. Back then, the mandate of the NSA was that it would never direct its surveillance apparatus domestically.
At the conclusion of that investigation, Frank Church, the Democratic senator from Idaho who chaired the investigative committee, warned: “The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything: telephone conversations, telegrams, it doesn’t matter.”
Additional reporting by Ewen MacAskill and Spencer Ackerman
http://m.guardiannews.com/world/2013/jun/06/nsa-phone-records-verizon-court-order
 

A big H/T to Dave for this article

The Guardian UK looks into Obama’s Verizon dragnet

NSA surveillance data-mining Verizon records

The Guardian UK reported:

Feinstein said she believed the order had been in place for some time. She said: “As far as I know this is the exact three-month renewal of what has been the case for the past seven years. This renewal is carried out by the [foreign intelligence surveillance] court under the business records section of the Patriot Act. Therefore it is lawful. It has been briefed to Congress.”

The Center for Constitutional Rights said in a statement that the secret court order was unprecedented. “As far as we know this order from the Fisa court is the broadest surveillance order to ever have been issued: it requires no level of suspicion and applies to all Verizon [business services] subscribers anywhere in the US.

“The Patriot Act’s incredibly broad surveillance provision purportedly authorizes an order of this sort, though its constitutionality is in question and several senators have complained about it.”

Russell Tice, a retired National Security Agency intelligence analyst and whistleblower, said: “What is going on is much larger and more systemic than anything anyone has ever suspected or imagined.”

Although an anonymous senior Obama administration official said that “on its face” the court order revealed by the Guardian did not authorise the government to listen in on people’s phone calls, Tice now believes the NSA has constructed such a capability.

“I figured it would probably be about 2015” before the NSA had “the computer capacity … to collect all digital communications word for word,” Tice said. “But I think I’m wrong. I think they have it right now.”

[*I did not include the link because of A/V problems with it.]

H/T to Dave