Almost a century later

This is a must see article, there is really no other way to describe it. H/T to Peppermint.

World War I soldier’s room untouched for almost 100 years

By Nick Kirkpatrick December 29, 2014 | Washington Post

His torn military jacket still hangs by his desk and his shoes are still tucked neatly by his bed — relics of a life lost long ago. In the small village of Bélâbre in central France sits the room of Hubert Rochereau, untouched for nearly a century as a memorial to the fallen solider, who died during World War I. It’s “an unforgettable journey back in time,” reported la Noveulle Republique, which described it as a “mummified room.”

See at Washington Post

The Guardian:

“Parents kept room as it was the day he left, and stipulated when they moved that it should not be changed for 500 years.”

It’s almost beyond description to see that someone kept the room just as it was. It’s like a time capsule. It’s fascinating someone could do that out of respect for all those years. What a memorial.

It reminded me of something else. Years back, some ‘old world’ descendants told me that it is common for people to pass down heirlooms for hundreds of years. So one could have furniture or keepsakes in their home home that are three or four hundred years old. But it takes something to preserve those things for centuries.

That begs the question if they have more appreciation and respect for things? It depends what you call old. In the US, we consider some things antiques after 25 years. The article raises a lot of questions.

The great centennial, WWI

WW1 centenary: how the events of August 4 1914 unfolded

Britain went to war on August 4 1914. In the final part of a four-day series, we document the dramatic events leading up to the declaration of war as they happened, hour-by-hour

By Richard Preston | 2:30PM BST 04 Aug 2014

The outbreak of war in 1914 is not an Agatha Christie drama at the end of which we will discover the culprit standing over a corpse in the conservatory with a smoking pistol. There is no smoking gun in this story; or rather there is one in the hands of every major character. — Christopher Clark, The SleepwalkersThe outbreak of war in 1914 is not an Agatha Christie drama at the end of which we will discover the culprit standing over a corpse in the conservatory with a smoking pistol. There is no smoking gun in this story; or rather there is one in the hands of every major character. — Christopher Clark, The Sleepwalkers

(Updated hour by hour.)

All times are London time unless marked CET – Central European

14.30 MPs are gathering in the House of Commons. David Lloyd George, Chancellor of the Exchequer, is to make a statement about the maintenance of trade and insurance against war risks, then it will be Asquith’s turn

14.00 Sir Edward Grey tells Goschen, Britain’s ambassador in Berlin, to repeat the request to Germany that Belgium’s neutrality be respected. A reply is required by midnight Central European time, 11pm in London.

Should no assurance be received, Goschen is to ask for his passports and tell Germany: ‘His Majesty’s Government feels bound to take all steps in their power to uphold the neutrality of Belgium and the observance of a Treaty to which Germany is as much a party as ourselves’.

More: The Telegraph (Continually being updated)